Dealing With Foreclosure – Understand The Process And Be Aware Of Your Rights

There are many reasons why homes go into foreclosure. Dealing with foreclosure is going to be difficult no matter what the cause. So if you’re facing a foreclosure it’s crucial that you understand as much as possible about the process and what your options are.

Why do homes go into foreclosure?

When a homeowner is late with a certain number of payments or stops making payments, the lender has the right to start the foreclosure process, depending on the terms of the mortgage agreement. It’s a good idea to be aware of what this “magic” number is so you can do whatever is necessary to avoid reaching it.

How long can homeowners remain in their homes once they go into foreclosure?

The law varies from state to state, so there is no set rule. In some states, homeowners can remain in the home for about a year. But in other states, the time frame may be as short as a few months. And in reality, there are some homeowners who don’t move out even when their home has gone into foreclosure. In that case, they may decide to wait for an eviction notice before leaving.

What is a redemption law and what exactly is a period of redemption?

When a home is foreclosed upon, many states allow a set period of time where the homeowner can repay any overdue payments on the mortgage. This is a redemption law and what it means is that the homeowner is able to reclaim his property if he meets the conditions set out. These conditions include repaying all monies owed within a specific time frame. It’s even possible to use the redemption law to reclaim a home that has been sold at auction.

What is meant by short sale and how does it work?

With a short sale what happens is that the property is sold but the net gain is less than the total amount owed. The lender though agrees to take the lesser amount. But, in some cases, the seller may still be on the hook for the difference between the total owed and the proceeds of the short sale. The advantage to the seller is that the foreclosure won’t show up on their credit report. The disadvantage is that you have to pay the difference, even though you’ve sold your home.

What is meant by deed-in-lieu of foreclosure?

Here the homeowner agrees to turn the deed for the property over to the lender. In return the mortgage is forgiven and foreclosure proceedings are canceled. The down side to this type of agreement is that the borrowers’ credit may be affected to the same degree as if there was a foreclosure.

Being informed can help a lot when you are dealing with foreclosure, so you are able to figure out your best options.

If you’re dealing with foreclosure learn about 6 practical steps you can take to avoid foreclosure. If it’s too late for that, find out how to stop a foreclosure by going to http://getforeclosurefacts.com

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